Thursday, August 02, 2007

Pineapple Cake Recipe


Simple Pineapple Cake
This is a light and delicious cake that has less butter than usual. Moist, slightly dense and packed with lots of flavour. Yummy!!

90g unsalted butter
4 pineapple rings (from canned pineapples)
200g plain flour
2 teaspoons baking powder
150g caster sugar
2 eggs
1 teaspoon vanilla essence
80ml pineapple juice (taken from the can of pineapples)

- Let butter soften a little at room temperature. Cut into cubes.
- Line the bottom of a round cake tin (7 inches in diameter and 3 inches deep) with greaseproof paper.
- Preheat the oven at 180°C for 10 minutes.
- Cut the pineapple rings into cubes. Set aside.
- Sift flour and baking powder. Mix well and set aside.
- Using an electric mixer, cream butter and sugar for a few minutes till light and fluffy.
- Beat the eggs lightly with the vanilla essence and add gradually to the butter mixture (with the mixer still on). Beat till well combined.
- Use a spatula or large spoon to fold in half the flour mixture into the butter mixture. Fold gently. Then add half the amount of pineapple juice and fold. Repeat the above step with the remaining flour and juice. Mix till just combined. Do not overmix.
- Toss the pineapple cubes in a little flour, then add half of them to the batter. Mix gently. Pour batter into the cake tin. Arrange the remaining pineapple cubes on the surface of the cake batter.
- Bake for 30 to 35 minutes till golden brown. Insert a skewer into the cake. If it comes out clean, the cake is ready. Allow the cake to cool for a few minutes. Run a knife round the sides of the cake, then overturn the cake onto a wire rack to cool.

Recipe Notes
- Coating the pineapple cubes in a little flour helps to prevent them from sinking to the bottom of the cake during baking.
- Do not overmix the cake batter as this will result in a heavy and dense cake. It is OK to leave the mixture slightly lumpy.

10 comments:

Anonymous said...

Hi Oi lin

why do we need to cut the butter in cubes? can we omit tis step?

Cheers
seah

Oi Lin said...

Dear Seah,
Thank you for your question.
Cutting the butter into cubes help to make it easier to cream the butter and sugar in the electric mixer. During creaming, the fine sugar crystals 'cut' into the butter cubes and help 'fluff' them up. To some extent, this introduces air into the butter cubes. Without this 'air', the cake will turn out very dense and heavy. If the butter is not cut into cubes, but simply thrown into the mixer in a block-form, the sugar will not be uniformly mixed with the butter and will not be able to perform the 'cutting' and 'fluffing' functions well.
Hope the above was helpful to you.

Regards,
Oi Lin

Anonymous said...

Hi Oi Lin,

Is the type of cake tine used important? How about square cake tine?

Thanks.

CH See

Oi Lin said...

Dear CH,
Thank you for writing.
Yes, the type of cake tin used is important. If the cake tin is too shallow, the cake will be overbaked and dry. If the cake tin is too deep, the middle portion of the cake will be undercooked. If the cake is too small, the cake will rise and overflow to the sides.
You can use square cake tin but its volume should be about the same as that stated in the recipe.

Regards,
Oi Lin

Anonymous said...

Hello Oi Lin,

This is very enlightening. I am a beginner in baking and find the info on your blog very interesting and useful.

Thanks a lot!

CH See

Anonymous said...

Hi Oi Lin

I tried out the pineapple cake last Sunday and it turned out well. I liked it because it is very light although my husband prefers something more buttery.

I am going to try out the Dim Sum bun on your recipe book next. Hope you can help with some questions I have.

1. Do you have a recommended brand for the dried instant yeast? Where can I get it? Phoon Huat?
2. What is the appropriate way to store the left-over yeast?
3. Where can I buy Hong Kong flour?
4. Can I replace with sweet filing as suggested with vegetables (turnips can carrots) to make "cai bao" instead?

Thanks in advance for your help. I like your recipe books.

regards,
CH See

Oi Lin said...

Dear CH,
Thank you for your purchase of my recipe books. So glad you like them!!
Here are the answers to your questions:
1. I don't have a particular brand of yeast that I use all the time. I've tried various brands, and they all work just as well. You can buy dried instant yeast at Phoon Huat, but it is also available at all supermarkets, eg. Fairprice, Cold Storage. Look under the 'Baking Needs' section, where all the flour and baking ingredients are displayed.
2. It is best to store leftover yeast in the same container it came in. The container should be airtight and kept in a dark and cool place. Use it before its expiry date.
3. You can buy Hong Kong flour at most supermarkets, eg. Fairprice, Cold Storage. Look under the 'Baking Needs' section. You can also use cake flour to make bao if you can't find Hong Kong flour.
4. I have not tried using my dim sum recipe to wrap vegetables to make cai bao. I'm not sure if it will work because the vegetable filling will probably be wetter than a sweet filling. And the wetness may cause the bao skin to be very soft and break apart! The dim sum bao skin in my cookbook is a rather light one, not the 'heavy' and dense type. But I will keep in mind the question you've asked, and when I've the time, I will experiment on a heavier and denser bao skin, so I can wrap vegetables, or meat filling in them.

Thank you for writing, CH, and may you have many hours of happy baking. Your husband is so lucky to have you bake for him!!

Regards,
Oi Lin

Anonymous said...

Hi Oi Lin,

Thanks for taking time to answer my questions. Perhaps I will go with the sweet filling first. My husband likes good red bean buns, so I think that will be a good choice of filling to try.

Have a nice weekend!

regards,
CH See

Anonymous said...

Hi Oi Lin,

I would like to know whether can I reduce the castor sugar to 80g. Do I have to adjust the quantity of other ingredients?

Thanks.

Poh

Oi Lin said...

Dear Poh,
Reducing the sugar to 80g means a reduction of the sugar by half. Although sugar has a not-so-good reputation nowadays, due to our health-conscious lifestyles (which is a good thing), sugar is needed in cakes to give it flavour. Sugar also helps give the cake some structure and softness. This is because when mixed with butter, the sugar helps introduce tiny air pockets into the butter (the sugar crystals 'cut' into the butter cubes). These air pockets make the cake soft and tender. I would suggest cutting down the sugar to 130g instead of 80g. However, do go ahead and reduce it to 80g if you wish. Experiment till you get the cake that is your ideal version. In baking, there is no right or wrong. You decide what to put into your cakes. Who knows, you may discover a new low-sugar way of baking! And wouldn't that be wonderful, because we will all be able to have our cake and eat it, and not worry about expanding waistlines!

Regards,
Oi Lin